Tacky Glue: an experiment

Following up my post on my Sealing EVA Foam Experiment, I have undertaken to expand my knowledge of Tacky Glue and its possible use to replace Plasti-Dip as my primary undercoating for EVA foam.

Experiment: 

Using a scrap piece of EVA foam I experimented with different thicknesses of tacky glue to try to determine what thickness would be best to create a shiny, metallic type surface out of EVA foam.

Materials: Elmer’s Craft Bond Tacky Glue  and Rust-oleum Bright Coat Metallic Finish spray paint.

tacky-glue-before-painting

Methodology: I sectioned off a scrap piece of foam and then sectioned it off.  1-8.   I applied 1 part glue to 1 part water concentration to the foam.  Section 1 was my control and received no glue coating.

tacky-glue-chart

P1180084.JPG

After one coat of spray paint, and before flexing.

finish-of-15-layers-of-tacky-glue

A close up of the 15 coat section. Notice that the hole in the foam has been significantly filled (incidentally, as I wasn’t really paying attention to that).  Also note the small black dots. These are little divots I believe was caused by air bubbles in the glue.

tacky-glue-small-wrinkles

On the far right in the section that got no glue. Notice the matted appearance of the no glue section.  The section in the middle and to the right are the 3 and 5 coat sections.  Notice the small micro wrinkles from flexing.

tacky-glue-larger-wrinkles

This is the 13 coat (on the left) and the 15 coat section. Notice the larger deeper wrinkles then the sections with less coats.

Conclusion: Tacky glue is a viable option for EVA foam undercoating.  A 1:1 ratio with water is ideal.  The more coats the smother surface, but larger deeper wrinkles. Less coats produces smaller finer wrinkles when flexed.   Air bubbles can be a problem, so more care, or perhaps a nice quality brush might reduce this problem.  I’m still concerned that this glue might harden over months of time and cause problems down the road.

Is it better than Plasti-dip?  It looks like I have another experiment to do.

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